ANTHROPOLOGIE
International Journal of Human Diversity and Evolution
 
Coverage: 1923-1941 (Vols. I-XIX) & 1962-2019 (Vols. 1-57)
ISSN 0323-1119 (Print)
ISSN 2570-9127 (Online)
News:
It is with deep regret and profound sadness that we inform all colleagues: Doc. MUDr. Vladimír Novotný, CSc, a long-time member of the editorial board of the Anthropologie, has died on 30th November 2019 at the age of 80 years.

World Archaeological Congres 9
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
 
 
Full text of article
'Strouhal E, Fawzi Gaballah M, Bonani G, Woelfli W, Němečková A, Saunders SR, 1994: Re-Investigation of the Remains Thought to Be of King Djoser and Those of an Unidentified Female from the Step Pyramid at Saqqara. Anthropologie (Brno) 32, 3: 225-242'.
 
Abstract
Human remains found in the granite chamber beneath the Step Pyramid at Saqqara by B. G. Gunn in 1926 and J.-P. Lauer in 1934, together with the skull and two postcranial bones of an unidentified female found at another place in the Step Pyramid, were re-examined macroscopically, radiologically, histologically, histomorphometrically and by radiocarbon dating. The embalming technique of the fragments alleged to be those of Djoser did not conform with that of the Old Kingdom. Histology showed a remarkable preservation of soft tissues. Macroscopic examination and histomorphometric analysis revealed different ages for individuals represented by single fragments. Radiocarbon tests demonstrated various dates, in no fragment, however, corresponding to the Third Dynasty date. On the other hand, the defleshed bones of the unidentified female gave date some hundred years earlier than the range of 2700 - 2600 yrs B.C. accepted for the Third Dynasty. The supposed remains of Djoser can be considered as belonging to Saite, Late Period or Early Ptolemaic secondary burials inside the Pyramid. The bones of the unidentified female were either from a burial deposited before the Third Dynasty or, if they belonged to the period of construction of the pyramid, then the dating of the Third Dynasty should be put back about 300 - 500 years earlier.
 
Keywords
King Djoser - Unidentified female - 1st-2nd and 3rd Dynasty - History - Archaeology - Anthropology - Histology - Histomorphometry - Radiocarbon dating
 
 
 
 

 Full text (PDF)

 Export citation

 Related articles